Wednesday, 18 July 2018

"Death of a Clown" seems an appropriate singalong for Liberal MHR Craig Kelly

Anthony Maslin, the Perth father whose three children were killed on MH17 which was shot down in 2014, accused US President Donald Trump of "kissing the arse" of Russian President Vladimir Putin at their Monday summit. Liberal backbencher Craig Kelly responded to the grieving parent by saying Russia's involvement should be "looked over" for the sake of good relations.


Death of a Clown will be the appropriate song when Mr Kelly loses preselection.

Tuesday, 17 July 2018

Greens and the yellow peril


Australia's Greens, it seems, have joined in the "fear the yellow peril" sentiment. The party's Tasmanian leader, Cassy O’Connor has called on the state government Government to explain why it has backed a 900 per cent increase in visa applications by Chinese business and skilled migrants. As reported by the Hobert Mercury Ms O'Connor believes “the relationship between the Hodgman Liberals and the Chinese Communist government is unhealthily close” .
“Will Hodgman is being played by the Chinese Communist party because he only understands the value of something if it’s got a dollar sign in front of it.
“He is putting Tasmania’s sovereignty, food security and environment in jeopardy.”

Singalong with big Trev Ruthenberg, the Liberal candidate for the Longman by-election




Monday, 16 July 2018

If Turnbull is greatly preferred to Shorten as PM, then why is the Coalition still trailing in the opinion polls?

If Australia had a presidential election, the opinion polls suggest that Malcolm Turnbull would defeat Bill Shorten easily. Newspoll this morning had the Prime Minister 19 percentage points in front of the Opposition Leader when voters were asked "Who do you think would make the better PM?" So why is it that Shorten's Labor lot have for ages now been comfortably in front of Turnbull's Coalition when it comes to voting intention?
That's a question the Liberal and National Parties should be thinking about.
The Owl reckons, for a start, they should be hiding this pair of vote losers:



Prime Ministers prove the need for compulsory sport in school

The federal government will lobby states to make sport mandatory in schools in a push to improve children's health and performance in class.
Federal Sports Minister Bridget McKenzie said physical activity was not just good for kids' health and wellbeing, with research now linking it to better learning.
"Sport is a powerful platform for a whole lot of things, not just for the fun of it (and) I want to use the power of sport whenever I can,'' Senator McKenzie told News Corp on Monday.





Tuesday, 10 July 2018

The group-think of journalists covering elections and a couple of victories they missed

For political journalists, writes Walter Shapiro on the US Brookings website, there is safety in a system that places inordinate emphasis on objective measures like polls and campaign coffers.
Before the votes are tallied, everything else in campaign stories is subjective. Experienced reporters make arbitrary decisions on who to quote, which anecdotes are relevant, and the “underlying mood of the electorate.” Sometimes their instincts are right, sometimes they become overly wedded to an existing storyline like Hillary Clinton’s inevitability.
At a moment when all reporters worry about accusations of bias, it is comforting to say their candidate assessments are based on tangible numbers from polls and fund-raising tallies. This invariably leads to group-think campaign coverage in which only the most iconoclastic reporters are willing to challenge the conventional wisdom about who will win.
Sometimes the herd gets it wrong when unexpected candidates run campaigns that go viral and the media ends up surprised.
That's what happened recently in a couple of Democratic primaries and the You Tube videos show why two political unknowns defeated well established incumbents.
In New York Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's “The Courage to Change” narrates a capsule history of her life, recounting how she was born in the Bronx, worked as an educator, organiser and waitress and became a candidate because “every day gets harder for working families like mine to get by.”


MJ Hegar, running in Texas, describes how "my whole life has been about opening, pushing, and sometimes kicking through every door in my way. Ready for a Congress that opens doors for Americans instead of slamming them in our faces? "

Monday, 9 July 2018

Singalong for Mark Latham and Pauline Hanson and the new love affair of Australian politics


Mark Latham has come to the aid of Pauline Hanson by making robocalls for One Nation in the Queensland by-election seat of Longman And tonight the pair further develop their new political marriage with a joint appearance on Sky News starring Graham Richardson as the best man.
It is something worth singing along to.