Wednesday, 13 September 2017

Are Sir Lynton Crosby and Mark Textor to blame? And some other suggested political reads for the day


  • In London's Financial Times Senior Tories play blame game over general election disaster has the Australian duo of Sir Lynton Crosby and Mark Textor on centre stage.  
  • As there are increasing calls for Australia to take in Rohingya refugees there s a cautionary snippet, again in the FT, saying that the Indian government believes Rohingya Muslims are "a potential security threat" after the emergence last year of a trained and well funded group of Rohingya militants led by Saudi-based émigrés.
  • And an election update from Russia provided by Reuters, At a Russian polling station, phantom voters cast ballots for the 'Tsar'. "At polling station no. 333 in the Russian city of Vladikavkaz, Reuters reporters only counted 256 voters casting their ballots in a regional election on Sunday. People were voting across Russia in what is seen as a dress rehearsal for next year’s presidential vote. Kremlin candidates for regional parliaments and governorships performed strongly nationwide.When the official results for polling station no. 333 were declared, the turnout was first given as 1,331 before being revised up to 1,867 on Tuesday.... - with 73 percent of the votes going to United Russia, the party of President Vladimir Putin."
  • Carmakers face electric reality as combustion engine outlook dims FRANKFURT (Reuters) - European car bosses are beginning to address the realities of mass vehicle electrification, and its consequences for jobs and profit, their minds focused by government pledges to outlaw the combustion engine.
  • A note on the ethics of the pharmaceutical industry - Drug maker ducks patent law by pretending its drugs belong to Mohawk tribe
  • Trump review leans toward proposing mini-nuke - Politico reports that the Trump administration is considering proposing smaller, more tactical nuclear weapons that would cause less damage than traditional thermonuclear bombs — a move that would give military commanders more options but could also make the use of atomic arms more likely.
  • China-born New Zealand MP probed by spy agency
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