Monday, 5 January 2015

Twitter has lots of problems – should sell itself to Google

shopping malls quote
  • The Economics (and Nostalgia) of Dead Malls – “Premature obituaries for the shopping mall have been appearing since the late 1990s, but the reality today is more nuanced, reflecting broader trends remaking the American economy. With income inequality continuing to widen, high-end malls are thriving, even as stolid retail chains like Sears, Kmart and J. C. Penney falter, taking the middle- and working-class malls they anchored with them. … Almost one-fifth of the nation’s enclosed malls have vacancy rates considered troubling by real estate experts — 10 percent or greater. Over 3 percent of malls are considered to be dying — with 40 percent vacancies or higher. That is up from less than 1 percent in 2006.”
  • Brazen Attempts by Hotels to Block Wi-Fi
  • Let this be the year when we put a proper price on carbon – “The fall in oil prices and declines in other energy prices make the case for a tax overwhelming”
  • Japan plans new communities to lure seniors out of shorthanded cities – “To encourage people in their 60s to vacate big cities while they are still fit and healthy, the government is trying to establish a new type of community in which senior citizens can live comfortably while staying socially engaged.”
passenger pigeon
  • The great extermination – “On October 4th last, in referring to a WWF report on the dramatic collapse in the numbers of our fellow creatures on earth, an Irish Times editorial talked about biodiversity loss and our consumerist culture: “the human family appears intent on spending down its natural resources to the last fish and the last tree.” Plus ça change … It’s an old story and the sorry extinction of the passenger pigeon in North America is a pertinent case study. Professor John Wilson Foster’s Pilgrims of the Air is a fascinating account of this extraordinary bird and its sudden demise at the end of the nineteenth century
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