Sunday, 24 November 2013

Capping the pay of top executives – News and views for Monday 25 November

News and views noted along the way.
2013-11-24_monarchbitterfly
  • The Year the Monarch Didn’t Appear - “On the first of November, when Mexicans celebrate a holiday called the Day of the Dead, some also celebrate the millions of monarch butterflies that, without fail, fly to the mountainous fir forests of central Mexico on that day. They are believed to be souls of the dead, returned. This year, for or the first time in memory, the monarch butterflies didn’t come, at least not on the Day of the Dead.”
  • Modest Progress at U.N. Climate Talks, Additional Climate Action Needed
  • Battle for new sanctions could harm Israel more than Iran, now that deal is done – “Israel finds itself isolated in the world arena, with only Saudi sheikhs and U.S. lawmakers at its side; perhaps it’s time to consider other diplomatic options besides perpetual petulance.” (Registration required)
  • Japan’s Cutthroat School System: A Cautionary Tale for the U.S. – “A new book shows how fixating on testing and achievement can backfire.”
  • A Conversation With: British Climate Economist Lord Nicholas Stern
  • CEO Pay: A Swiss Rebellion – “Next Sunday, on November 24, Swiss voters will go to the polls to cast their votes on a referendum trying to cap top-level executive pay. The ’1:12 Initiative’ – designed to limit compensation at twelve times the salary of the lowest paid worker in the company – has had tempers in Swiss public life boiling for several weeks. This vote follows on the heels of another earlier this year, when … a solid majority of Swiss voters supported a constitutional amendment to … require a shareholder vote on executive compensation, ban sign-on bonuses, golden parachutes and certain forms of profit sharing – and enforce all of the above with criminal sanctions.”
  • For Chess, a Would-Be White Knight “A colorful entrepreneur named Andrew Paulson wants to turn chess into the world’s next mass-market spectator sport, complete with commentators who dissect the action and show potential moves.”
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